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Gatlin Archaeological Park

The park is not open to the public at this time.
The Gatlin site was unearthed in 1959 as the result of an archaeological survey done at the request of the Army Corps of Engineers while preparing to build the Painted Rocks Dam in a nearby area. Archaeologists, William Walsay and Alfred Johnson laboured to discover an area of about 300 acres that would become the Gatlin Site. Gatlin, in it's glory days, was a large argriculture, trading and manufacturing community of around 500 people. It was situated along a major Hohokam trade route, and because of its two ceremonial ball courts and the discovery of one of the earliest plaform mounds, Gatlin is considered to have held prominence in the community. Gatlin is designated as a National Historic Landmark.